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Teachers Paying Teachers for Lesson Plans

October 17, 2016

Kacey Potter, 8th grade English teacher in Rice Virginia, has earned more than $150,000 over the past five years by selling her curriculum to other teachers via Teachers Pay Teachers — lesson plans, PowerPoint presentations, activities, tests, thematic unit plans, worksheets, mini-courses. Facebook All About Me Back to School Activity is $1.50. An entire 7th-, 8th-  or 9th- grade curriculum is $145. “I started really getting into tech and teaching when our school first started using interactive whiteboards and I was the only teacher who could figure out how to use them. That snowballed into my blogging

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Stretch Your Mind: Code

October 13, 2016

One of the most publicly prominent elements of the current interest in math and science education has been the adage that everyone should learn to code. When arguing for universal coding literacy, promoters often frame the benefits of coding as directly practical — a higher paying job, entry into an important industry, etc. In his thoughtful essay, Basel Farag explains how the direct connection between learning to program and earning a profit is separated by a few question marks. As Farag puts it: We live in an ultra-competitive world, with people turning to all sorts of

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Watchworthy Wednesday: 2016 DML Keynote Recap

October 12, 2016

In case you weren’t among the nearly 500 people at the 7th annual Digital Media and Learning Conference last week at the University of California, Irvine, here are highlights from the keynotes. What is the Intellectual Culture of Games? Thanks to two factors that have emerged — mobile gaming and a healthy indie ecosystem — video games are in “the golden age,” according to games expert Constance Steinkuehler, presently a professor in digital media at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and co-director of the Games+Learning+Society Center at the Wisconsin Institute of Discovery and soon to join the UCI

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Robin DeRosa – Ignite Talk DML2016

October 11, 2016

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Kim Jaxon – Ignite Talk DML2016

October 11, 2016

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Mark Deppe – Ignite Talk DML2016

October 11, 2016

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Annie Mais – Ignite Talk DML2016

October 11, 2016

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Kate Green – Ignite Talk DML2016

October 11, 2016

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Nick Ross – Ignite Talk DML2016

October 11, 2016

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Laurel Felt – Ignite Talk DML2016

October 11, 2016

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Remi Kalir – Ignite Talk DML2016

October 11, 2016

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DML2016 – Ignite Talks Round 1

October 10, 2016

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DML2016 – Ignite Talks Round 2

October 10, 2016

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Why It’s Time to Let Go of ‘Meritocracy’

October 10, 2016

Meritocracy seems like an unassailable concept. Who could argue with a belief that the ‘brightest and the best’ should reach the highest levels in society? In a heavily class-conscious society (like England), meritocracy proves an extremely alluring way of looking at the world. The idea is so simple: we provide objective, universal tests and this avoids nepotism and entrenched privilege. Everyone, it is argued, has a path to the top. Recently, the Conservative government in the UK made it known that they were considering allowing new grammar schools to be created. This proves a controversial topic,

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The New York Times Learning Network Civil Conversation Challenge for Teenagers

October 7, 2016

Teenagers all over the world are invited to take part in the New York Times Learning Network’s Civil Conversation Challenge by taking part in discussions of big issues dividing Americans this campaign season, such as immigration, climate change, and race, gender, and identity.

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How are Digital Learning Educators Made?

October 6, 2016

Last year, I read Elizabeth Green’s “Building a Better Teacher” and it changed the way I understood education in America. Fundamental to this essential history (of recent efforts at education reform, not just in the U.S. but around the world) is the question of whether teachers are born or made. The book’s subtitle telegraphs Green’s answer “How Teaching Works (and How to Teach It to Everyone).” If teachers are born, then all we need to do is support those inherently strong at it then push out the rest. If they are made, however, the task is

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