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Welcome to the University of California’s New Digital Media and Learning Research Hub and Website

David Theo Goldberg
Oct 25, 2009

Today, at the forum on Breakthrough Learning in a Digital Age, being hosted by the Sesame Workshop at Google headquarters, we are announcing the launch of a major new research initiative in digital…

blog

The Rhetoric of MySpace vs. Facebook

danah boyd
Oct 25, 2009

From Eszter Hargittai’s scholarship to more recent work by marketing analytics firms, we know that race and socio-economic status shape MySpace and Facebook usage. Yet, it is the rhetoric used…

media release

New Digital Library Space Opened for Teens in Chicago

October 22, 2009

YouMedia, a new digital library space for teens, opened this month at the Chicago Public Library. Supported by MacArthur, the new space is designed to engage young adults with library resources and connect them to Chicago’s educational and cultural communities through the use of digital technologies. YouMedia houses thousands of

media release

Global Competition Selects 19 Innovative Digital Media & Learning Projects to Share $2 Million

October 22, 2009

(Chicago, IL) — Nineteen projects from around the world were awarded funding today to explore digital media’s ability to help people learn. In a $2 million competition funded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, winners include a radically affordable $12 TV-computer, a video blogging site for young

media release

New Study Shows Time Spent Online Important for Teen Development

October 22, 2009

(San Francisco, CA) — Results from the most extensive U.S. study on teens and their use of digital media show that America’s youth are developing important social and technical skills online – often in ways adults do not understand or value. “It might surprise parents to learn that it is

media release

DIGITAL MEDIA ARE CHANGING HOW YOUNG PEOPLE LEARN; EDUCATION EXPERTS URGE NEW POLICY CONSIDERATIONS

October 22, 2009

Washington, DC (September 21, 2009) Digital media are changing the way young people learn, play, socialize and participate in civic life, and these changes have important policy implications, according to a panel of experts participating in a Capitol Hill briefing today. The event, hosted by the Consortium for School Networking

publication

Engineering Play

September 30, 2009

Today, computers are part of kids’ everyday lives, used both for play and for learning. We envy children’s natural affinity for computers, the ease with which they click in and out of digital worlds. Thirty years ago, however, the computer belonged almost exclusively to business, the military, and academia. In

publication

New Digital Media and Learning as an Emerging Area and “Worked Examples” as One Way Forward

July 31, 2009

In this report, noted scholar James Paul Gee discusses the evolution of digital media and learning (DMAL) from its infancy as an “academic area” into a more organized field or coherent discipline. Distinguishing among academic areas, fields, disciplinary specializations, and thematic disciplines, Gee describes other academic areas that have fallen

publication

Young People, Ethics, and the New Digital Media

June 30, 2009

Social networking, blogging, vlogging, gaming, instant messaging, downloading music and other content, uploading and sharing their own creative work: these activities made possible by the new digital media are rich with opportunities and risks for young people. This report, part of the GoodPlay Project, undertaken by researchers at Harvard Graduate

publication

Living and Learning with New Media

May 31, 2009

This report summarizes the results of an ambitious three-year ethnographic study, funded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, into how young people are living and learning with new media in varied settings—at home, in after school programs, and in online spaces. It offers a condensed version of

publication

Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture

April 30, 2009

Many teens today who use the Internet are actively involved in participatory cultures—joining online communities (Facebook, message boards, game clans), producing creative work in new forms (digital sampling, modding, fan videomaking, fan fiction), working in teams to complete tasks and develop new knowledge (as in Wikipedia), and shaping the flow

publication

The Civic Potential of Video Games

March 31, 2009

This report focuses on the civic aspects of video game play among youth. According to a 2006 survey, 58 percent of young people aged 15 to 25 were civically “disengaged,” meaning that they participated in fewer than two types of either electoral activities (defined as voting, campaigning, etc.) or civic

publication

The Future of Learning Institutions in a Digital Age

February 28, 2009

In this report, Cathy N. Davidson and David Theo Goldberg focus on the potential for shared and interactive learning made possible by the Internet. They argue that the single most important characteristic of the Internet is its capacity for world-wide community and the limitless exchange of ideas. The Internet brings

publication

Welcome to Our Virtual Worlds

February 28, 2009

Source: Educational Leadership March 2009 | Volume 66 | Number 6 Literacy 2.0 Pages 48-52 Abstract: The United States is witnessing a growing student engagement crisis. With dropout rates approaching 50 percent in many urban school districts (Swanson, 2008) and recent education surveys showing that students are overwhelmingly bored in

publication

Deep Learning Properties of Good Digital Games: How Far Can They Go?

December 31, 2008

Source: Originally published in Theories and Mechanisms: Serious Games for Learning

publication

Democracy for Some: The Civic Opportunity Gap in High School

January 31, 2008

In our study of high school civic opportunities, we found that a student’s race and academic track, and a school’s average socioeconomic status (SES) determines the availability of the school-based civic learning opportunities that promote voting and broader forms of civic engagement. High school students attending higher SES schools, those